NATA Safety 1st Is Seeking Member Photos of Ground Handling Operations

NATA Safety 1st is currently redeveloping its online training content to incorporate improvements and new features suggested by our members and users. As part of this process, we are seeking new photographs of ground handling activities, such as aircraft fuel and oil servicing, quality control checks, and towing operations. If your company is interested in sharing photos of ground handling operations at your facilities, and possibly having these images featured in the redeveloped NATA Safety 1st training program, please contact our Trainer/Content Manager Steve Berry at sberry@nata.aero.

NATA Hosts First Advanced Line Service Workshop of 2018 | Next Workshop February 21-22 in Long Beach

Last week, NATA kicked off its 2018 Advanced Line Service (ALS) Workshop training series at Gateway Aviation Services in Mesa, AZ. The two-day event included sessions on motivation and leadership techniques, customer service best practices, misfueling prevention and the impact of human factors on aviation ground handling. Guest speakers Rick Spencer of Facet Filters and Reed Fuller of World Fuel Services also instructed attendees on aviation fuel filtration and quality control. The Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport Fire Department provided hands on fire-extinguisher training during the workshop.

NATA would like to thank Matt Nebgen, Shannon Jones and all the staff at Gateway Aviation Services for hosting the association’s first 2018 ALS workshop.

Register now for NATA’s next ALS workshop on February 21-22 at Ross Aviation in Long Beach, CA. Click here for upcoming dates and registration information.

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ALS attendees strategize on risk mitigations for Human Factors that affect aviation ground handling.

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Reed Fuller with World Fuel Services leads a session on aviation fuel quality control.

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One of our ALS attendees extinguishes a live fire with the Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport Fire department.

 

NATA Presents New Safety 1st Subscription Program

NATA’s New Safety 1st Subscription Program
Expand your training program, not your budget

NATA is pleased to announce the industry-wide launch of its Safety 1st Subscription Program — offering unlimited use of all NATA Safety 1st training at a fixed annual cost and eliminating the additional training expenses incurred by employee turnover. This new program includes a budget-friendly option for monthly billing of the annual fee.

Until now, Safety 1st training has been offered solely on a license-based system, requiring seats to be purchased per student, per course. With 30 online training courses to choose from, the administrative burden of purchasing, assigning and keeping track of licenses can quickly become overwhelming.

The new Subscription Program allows users to access all Safety 1st training at any time, an opportunity to broaden the skills of your staff as you see fit. Courses including health and safety, deicing and hazardous materials are now included in your subscription price. Training your supervisors or line service technicians in 2, 4, 6 or more different disciplines no longer changes your annual training costs and allows your employee to receive even more benefit from their Safety 1st training.

NATA’s Safety 1st Subscription Program also eliminates one of the biggest stressors of the license-based system — paying to train new employees resulting from turnover. Now, the departing employee is simply marked inactive in the system, opening that training slot to your new hire — reducing your additional training expense to zero.

Fixed annual training costs, unlimited use of all Safety 1st training, an option for monthly billing of the annual fee and the elimination of employee training turnover expenses — this new approach is quickly becoming the preferred method of training!

For more information on NATA’s Safety 1st Subscription Program, contact us at safety1st@nata.aero or listen to our podcast!

NATA Safety 1st Participates in Air BP Product Quality and Operations Seminar

On June 20th, NATA’s Trainer/Content Manager Steve Berry participated in Air BP’s Product Quality and Operations Seminar in Grand Rapids, MI. Berry provided attendees with an industry update on ground handling safety, the latest in the Safety 1st redevelopment process and information on the IS-BAH (International Standard for Business Aircraft Handling) program. The one-day event included hands-on fueling procedure demonstrations and offered insight on aviation fuel filtration, product quality assurance, microbiological contamination, misfueling prevention, and fuel system maintenance.

Steve @ air bp 6.20.17

EAN Aviation Becomes First African Safety 1st Qualified Location to Appear on NATA’s Global FBO/Ground Handler Status Map

EAN Aviation, of Lagos, Nigeria is the first African company to receive the Safety 1st qualified designation.

To read more about EAN Aviation’s latest achievement, click here.

The FBO/Ground Handler Status Map launched in April to highlight FBOs and ground handlers that are Safety 1st qualified and/or (IS-BAH) registered. View the map at www.fbostatus.com.

CONGRATULATIONS: Curaçao Air Terminal Services Earn IS-BAH Certification

NATA would like to congratulate member, Curaçao Air Terminal Services (CATS) for recently becoming IS-BAH Registered!

Click here to read about CATS’ accomplishment.

Check out the FBO / Ground Handling Status Map to see what other service facilities are Safety 1st Qualified and/or IS-BAH registered. To find out more about the IS-BAH program, please visit http://nata.aero/Safety-1st.aspx.

IS-BAH: What Can It Do for You?

Almost two years have passed since the launch of the ISBAH audit standard. By now, you’ve probably heard about the International Standard for Business Aircraft Handling (IS-BAH) and what it means for aircraft ground service providers. If you’re like many in the industry, however, you probably also have several unanswered questions about how the standard works in practice, and how it interfaces with the work you are already doing. While IS-BAH may sound like just another round of best practices, it is much more than a passing fad. In fact, the fundamental elements of IS-BAH provide operators with far-reaching benefits, including international compliance, marketing advantages, better efficiency and communication, and of course, safety and more resilient operations.

Many aircraft operators are ahead of those of us in the ground services industry in terms of a systems-level view of managing safety and quality. IS-BAO, Air Charter Safety Foundation and other audit standards have been around for years in Parts 91 and 135 flight operations, and are often a requirement for client contracts or charter brokers. Today, hundreds of flight operations have undergone the rigorous process for achieving IS-BAO registration. In the February 2015 issue of the Aviation Business Journal, I wrote about defining safety as much more than the absence of negative events; and the comprehensive framework of IS-BAO has proven a valuable system for helping operators better manage safety, quality, and operational effectiveness. IS-BAH provides the same benefits to ground handling organizations, and it complements existing programs for training and service.

IS-BAO and IS-BAH are managed by the International Business Aviation Council (IBAC) and were developed by members of the business aviation and handling communities. We’ll focus a bit more on IBAC—as opposed to some of the other standardization bodies—because it is the organization that manages the IS-BAH standard. IBAC’s member organizations include 14 business aviation associations from around the world. IBAC has permanent observer status with the International Civil Aviation Organization; and is an advocate for the business aviation community in that forum as well as others. When an operator chooses to conduct an audit to the IS-BAH standard, they do so through one of the accredited auditors listed on the IBAC website. IBAC itself does not conduct audits, so any agreement for the conduct, expectations, and costs associated with an audit are arranged between the operator and the auditor they choose.

Standards at face value are a way to provide structure and assurance that products and services are delivered safely and reliably and meet certain basic levels of quality. From an organizational perspective, standards are more than just a means for achieving quality and safety. They provide a framework for strategic direction as well, by incorporating a set of tools to minimize waste and errors, capitalize on improvements in communication, and increase productivity. IS-BAH and IS-BAO share common roots in the long-established ISO 9001 standard, one of the many standards the International Organization for Standardization promulgates around the world.

The primary focus of the IS-BAH standard (and the IS-BAO) is on systems. What that often means in practice is that we must adopt a holistic, process-based view of how we approach our business. Even in the heavily-regulated world of Part 121 and 135 carriers, standards are a useful way of codifying not only what we do, but how we do it at an organizational level, and how we continuously improve as a group. An important distinction is that IS-BAH is a performance standard. Rather than focusing on compliance with a strict set of guidelines, the standard seeks to push registered operators to design systems that can be monitored and validated toward reducing inefficiency and better identifying risk. Risk is an important element to IS-BAH, because the central tenet of the standard is a sound, appropriate, and effective safety management system.

Why is participation in a standard like IS-BAH a great idea, even if you already utilize the NATA Safety 1st Professional Line Service (PLST) curricula? The short answer is Continue reading