EAN Aviation Becomes First African Safety 1st Qualified Location to Appear on NATA’s Global FBO/Ground Handler Status Map

EAN Aviation, of Lagos, Nigeria is the first African company to receive the Safety 1st qualified designation.

To read more about EAN Aviation’s latest achievement, click here.

The FBO/Ground Handler Status Map launched in April to highlight FBOs and ground handlers that are Safety 1st qualified and/or (IS-BAH) registered. View the map at www.fbostatus.com.

IS-BAH: What Can It Do for You?

Almost two years have passed since the launch of the ISBAH audit standard. By now, you’ve probably heard about the International Standard for Business Aircraft Handling (IS-BAH) and what it means for aircraft ground service providers. If you’re like many in the industry, however, you probably also have several unanswered questions about how the standard works in practice, and how it interfaces with the work you are already doing. While IS-BAH may sound like just another round of best practices, it is much more than a passing fad. In fact, the fundamental elements of IS-BAH provide operators with far-reaching benefits, including international compliance, marketing advantages, better efficiency and communication, and of course, safety and more resilient operations.

Many aircraft operators are ahead of those of us in the ground services industry in terms of a systems-level view of managing safety and quality. IS-BAO, Air Charter Safety Foundation and other audit standards have been around for years in Parts 91 and 135 flight operations, and are often a requirement for client contracts or charter brokers. Today, hundreds of flight operations have undergone the rigorous process for achieving IS-BAO registration. In the February 2015 issue of the Aviation Business Journal, I wrote about defining safety as much more than the absence of negative events; and the comprehensive framework of IS-BAO has proven a valuable system for helping operators better manage safety, quality, and operational effectiveness. IS-BAH provides the same benefits to ground handling organizations, and it complements existing programs for training and service.

IS-BAO and IS-BAH are managed by the International Business Aviation Council (IBAC) and were developed by members of the business aviation and handling communities. We’ll focus a bit more on IBAC—as opposed to some of the other standardization bodies—because it is the organization that manages the IS-BAH standard. IBAC’s member organizations include 14 business aviation associations from around the world. IBAC has permanent observer status with the International Civil Aviation Organization; and is an advocate for the business aviation community in that forum as well as others. When an operator chooses to conduct an audit to the IS-BAH standard, they do so through one of the accredited auditors listed on the IBAC website. IBAC itself does not conduct audits, so any agreement for the conduct, expectations, and costs associated with an audit are arranged between the operator and the auditor they choose.

Standards at face value are a way to provide structure and assurance that products and services are delivered safely and reliably and meet certain basic levels of quality. From an organizational perspective, standards are more than just a means for achieving quality and safety. They provide a framework for strategic direction as well, by incorporating a set of tools to minimize waste and errors, capitalize on improvements in communication, and increase productivity. IS-BAH and IS-BAO share common roots in the long-established ISO 9001 standard, one of the many standards the International Organization for Standardization promulgates around the world.

The primary focus of the IS-BAH standard (and the IS-BAO) is on systems. What that often means in practice is that we must adopt a holistic, process-based view of how we approach our business. Even in the heavily-regulated world of Part 121 and 135 carriers, standards are a useful way of codifying not only what we do, but how we do it at an organizational level, and how we continuously improve as a group. An important distinction is that IS-BAH is a performance standard. Rather than focusing on compliance with a strict set of guidelines, the standard seeks to push registered operators to design systems that can be monitored and validated toward reducing inefficiency and better identifying risk. Risk is an important element to IS-BAH, because the central tenet of the standard is a sound, appropriate, and effective safety management system.

Why is participation in a standard like IS-BAH a great idea, even if you already utilize the NATA Safety 1st Professional Line Service (PLST) curricula? The short answer is Continue reading

CONGRATULATIONS: TEXAS JET AND I.A.M. JET CENTRE EARN IS-BAH CERTIFICATION

NATA would like to congratulate two members who are Safety 1st Qualified for recently becoming IS-BAH Registered: Texas Jet and I.A.M. Jet Centre, Jamaica!

Click here to read about I.A.M. Jet Centre’s accomplishment.

Click here to read about Texas Jet’s accomplishment.

Check out the FBO / Ground Handling Status Map to see who else is Safety 1st Qualified and/or IS-BAH registered.

To get more information about the IS-BAH program, please visit www.nata.aero/safety1st.

NATA Launches Free, Industry-Wide Misfueling Prevention Awareness Training

This week, the National Air Transportation Association (NATA) released the Safety 1st General Aviation Misfueling Prevention Program – a free, online-based awareness program for pilots, line service professionals, FBO general managers and customer service representatives.

NATA, recognizing the need for an industry-wide misfueling prevention resource, developed the program to conform with standards from the Energy Institute and the NATA Safety 1st Operational Best Practices. The program consists of four different misfueling informational tracks, resources and certificates of completion.

NATA thanks the AOPA Air Safety Institute and the General Aviation Manufacturers Association for their assistance in producing this program. Additionally, the program was funded by grants from Eastern Aviation Fuels, EPIC Aviation, Phillips 66 and others.

The misfueling prevention program and additional resources can be found at www.preventmisfueling.com.

Safety 1st Wraps Up Inaugural Regional Advanced Line Service Workshop

Over the past two days, line service professionals participated in the first ever Safety 1st Regional Line Service Workshop in St. Louis. The workshop, which sold out with nearly 30 attendees, was hosted by Jet Aviation St. Louis and the St. Louis Downtown Airport Fire Department.

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Workshop attendees learned about the latest in aviation fuel handling and quality control from Reed Fuller with World Fuel Services. Heavy rains forced the cancellation of the hands-on portion of the session, but Mr. Fuller was prepared and moved on to teach the basics of managing Human Factors to prevent accidents and incidents on the ramp.

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Michelle Ventker, Facilitator with ServiceElements, International, lead an in-depth session focusing on helping the attendees become customer service leaders. This session featured discussions among the diverse group of attendees on the everyday techniques that lead to building repeat customers as well as attracting new business.

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One of the highlights of the workshop was the hands-on, live-fire, portable fire extinguisher practice lead by Captain James Hinchey with the St. Louis Downtown Fire Department. Each of the attendees received instruction on the proper use of a portable fire extinguisher and was able to practice putting out a fire using the department’s live-fire practice rig.

We are very grateful to the Regional ALS Sponsors for helping to make this workshop an overwhelming success!

ServiceElements, International

AirBP

World Fuel Services

TAC Air

Beacon Aviation Insurance

Stay tuned. Safety 1st hopes to announce the date and time of our next Regional ALS in the coming weeks!

Visit or return to NATA website: www.nata.aero