NATA Wraps Up Successful Second Annual Ground Handling Safety Symposium

Continuing its leadership role in driving general aviation ground handling safety initiatives, NATA concluded the second annual Ground Handling Safety Symposium (GHSS) on September 12, 2018. The NATA GHSS is the first industry event dedicated solely to general aviation ground handling safety and includes expert speakers, open forum discussions and industry incident case-studies to provide attendees an interactive experience.

Attendees explored the dynamics between just culture and individual accountability, the challenges of managing safety in a multi-generational workforce and the role of risk management in dealing with fatigue on the ramp. During the open forum sessions, moderated by members of the NATA Safety Committee, attendees discussed the common challenges affecting safety management system implementation, fuel contamination prevention, on-ramp usage of personal electronics and more.

In addition to the great sessions, discussions and case studies, NATA GHSS attendees were able to network with other safety professionals from across our industry at the networking event held at Top Golf in Ashburn, VA.

The 2018 NATA GHSS was made possible with the support of ServiceElements International, Facet Filters, Baldwin Aviation Safety, FBOPartners, Chubb Insurance and CrewID.

Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) Contamination Risk | NATA Fuel QC Training and Resources Available

Our industry has seen several incidents in recent months where DEF was accidently injected into jet fuel instead of FSII, causing significant aircraft damage. Although none of these incidents led to an aircraft crash, there is a substantial risk of engine failure in aircraft fueled with DEF contaminated fuel. NATA urges its members that utilize Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) and Fuel System Icing Inhibitor (FSII or Prist) to review their storage, handling and personnel training procedures to prevent dangerous fuel contamination.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has released a Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) that addresses the dangers of DEF contaminated aviation fuel.

In December of 2017, NATA released a DEF Contamination Prevention training course through its Safety 1st Supplemental Safety Training program. This course is provided free of charge to anyone in the industry and could help prevent future incidents related to DEF Contamination. Current Safety 1st users have the ability to assign the DEF Contamination Prevention course to their employees utilizing their Safety 1st training account. Companies that are not current Safety 1st users should contact us for complimentary access to the DEF Contamination Prevention course.

Current Safety 1st Users – click here for directions on assigning courses

Non Safety 1st Users – click here to contact us at safety1st@nata.aero

Additionally, NATA provides the following resources to assist and educate our members on aviation fuel management:

For questions regarding DEF contamination prevention or any of the resources described in this alert, please contact safety1st@nata.aero.

NATA HOSTS FIFTH ADVANCED LINE SERVICE WORKSHOP OF 2018 | NEXT WORKSHOP OCTOBER 24-25 IN LONG ISLAND, NY

Last week, NATA wrapped up another successful Advanced Line Service Workshop at Austin Executive Airport in Texas. ALS workshops include a unique mix of technical and service training with sessions on motivation and leadership techniques, customer service training, misfueling prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures (SPCC) training, and the impact of human factors on aviation ground handling. Guest speakers Collin Self of Facet Filters and Keith Clark of Phillips 66 led sessions on aviation fuel filtration, quality control and misfueling prevention. Attendees received hands-on fire extinguisher training during a live fire demonstration conducted by West Chicago Fire Department.

NATA would like to thank Jodie Kaluza and all the staff at Austin Executive Airport for making this event possible. We also appreciate Facet Filters for sponsoring the remaining 2018 ALS Workshops!

There are only 2 more ALS workshops left for this year! Click here for dates and registration information.

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Gammon Technical Releases DP Limiting Device Adjustment Instructions

In light of the recent industry changes concerning filter monitors, Gammon Technical has issued the following instructions, which detail how to set the maximum differential pressure (DP) on their GTP-8980 DP limiting device. As per ATA 103 v2017.2, DP limiting devices are required on all filter monitor vessels and set points must be adjusted to reflect the 15psi limit by no later than January 31, 2018. If your facility uses a different DP limiting device, you should contact your manufacturer for specific instructions.

For more information on this issue, please see our other blog posts concerning the recent industry changes for filter monitors.

Airlines for America Releases ATA 103 Update and New Revision

This month, Airlines for America (A4A) published bulletin 2017.2: Modified ATA 103 Requirements for Filter Monitors, and released a revised ATA 103 (v2017.2) which includes updates from the bulletin and will replace the previous 2017.1 revision. The bulletin and revised ATA 103 come after the IATA SAP Special Interests Group’s position statement regarding filter monitors. Key highlights of the bulletin and revised ATA 103 include a reduction in the maximum differential pressure (DP) for filter monitor elements to 15psid and the addition of section 3.17 to the ATA 103 which details an Aircraft Fueling Nozzle Strainer Cleaning Procedure for Fueling Equipment with Filter Monitors.

Key highlights of the bulletin include a reduction in the maximum differential pressure (DP) for filter monitor elements to 15psid and the addition of section 3.17 to the ATA 103, which details an Aircraft Fueling Nozzle Strainer Cleaning Procedure for Fueling Equipment with Filter Monitors.

Important Industry Update Concerning Monitor Filter Elements

Last month, the International Air Transportation Association (IATA) issued a position statement from their special interest group on Super Absorbent Polymer or, SAP (the media used in EI 1583 filter monitor cartridges), which recommended that filter monitors be phased out of all aviation fuel handling systems. The announcement came after eight separate, documented incidents in which SAP was found downstream in engine/airframe fuel system components.

Following the initial position statement from IATA, several leading industry groups have issued their own statements. As such, Parker’s Velcon Aviation Filtration Division issued Service Bulletin 1217-1, which seeks to clarify the various current positions. The bulletin includes the collective “best practices” of IATA, A4A, JIG, and EI along with Parker’s “go-forward” actions for their EI 1583 qualified monitor elements.

The recommendations include:

  • Fuel filter monitors to meet new 7th edition criteria from the Energy Institute (Implementation period TBD)
  • Maximum allowable monitor vessel differential pressure-15 psid (1 bar) *This is an important reduction from the 22 psid outlined in the latest revision of ATA Spec 103.
  • Differential pressure switches for use on fuel filter monitor housings
  • Change all nozzle hose end strainers to 100 mesh
  • Regular cleaning of the hose end strainer (final procedure and timing TBD)

This is an ongoing issue and NATA will continue to keep you updated on the latest developments as they become available.

 

NATA Holds Successful Advanced Line Service Workshop at Duncan Aviation

NATA wrapped up another successful Advanced Line Service Workshop last week at Duncan Aviation in Lincoln, NE. The two-day event included sessions on Motivation and Leadership techniques, Customer Service training, Misfueling Prevention, and how Human Factors affect safety in aviation ground handling. Guest speakers Dennis Thompson of Peco-Facet, and Keith Clark of Phillips 66 also led sessions on aviation fuel filtration and quality control, and Justin Schack of General Fire and Safety provided hands on fire-extinguisher training.

Attendees also toured the MRO, Paint, and Fuel Farm facilities at Duncan Aviation.

Ed Sabata- Line Service Trainer/QA Specialist for Duncan Aviation who attended the event said:

“This is one of the best training courses I have been to. Always a good refresher course to keep you motivated. A great course for any Line Service Rep.”

NATA would like to thank Megan Sanburn, Troy Hyberger, and all the staff at Duncan Aviation for making this event possible.

Register now for the last ALS workshop of 2017 this November in Fort Myers, FL!

NATA Safety 1st Participates in Air BP Product Quality and Operations Seminar

On June 20th, NATA’s Trainer/Content Manager Steve Berry participated in Air BP’s Product Quality and Operations Seminar in Grand Rapids, MI. Berry provided attendees with an industry update on ground handling safety, the latest in the Safety 1st redevelopment process and information on the IS-BAH (International Standard for Business Aircraft Handling) program. The one-day event included hands-on fueling procedure demonstrations and offered insight on aviation fuel filtration, product quality assurance, microbiological contamination, misfueling prevention, and fuel system maintenance.

Steve @ air bp 6.20.17

Including Safety in Your FBO Selection

Aircraft operators consider a number of factors when choosing an FBO: available facilities, customer service, fuel cost, hangar availability, location and fees. As you read that list, one important item is absent – safety. A recent study by the VanAllen Group found that ground incidents accounted for “the largest source of [insurance] claims payments.”

Though safety is not on the list above, the bottom line is that aircraft operators care about safety in all they do. In fact, a focus on FBO safety is considered a given expectation. Think about the last time you went to a restaurant; did you spend any time thinking about whether the food you consumed would give you food poisoning? Probably not, and this is not because you don’t care about food safety, but rather because you assume that restaurant is focusing on preventing food borne illness. The same is true with FBO selection, an FBO with quality facilities, great customer service, and competitive pricing must be doing the right things when it comes to safety, correct?

FBO safety is also challenging to assess from afar. How can a dispatcher, scheduler or flight coordinator effectively evaluate an FBO’s safety program during a phone call? Challenges aside, with ground handling incidents being a leading cause of aircraft damage, our industry has determined that aircraft operators should be even more proactive when it comes to ensuring ground safety of aircraft at remote locations. Standards like the International Standard – Business Aircraft Operations (IS-BAO) and the Air Charter Safety Foundation’s (ACSF) Industry Audit Standard (IAS) both include requirements for reviewing ground handling safety while aircraft are away from home. So what can an aircraft operator do?

First, we must understand the basis for ground handling safety in our industry. In the U.S. ground handling is governed by industry standard. Some of those standards include Airlines for America’s (A4A) Spec 103 (fuel quality), NATA’s Safety 1st Program (operational safety training) and the International Standard – Business Aircraft Handling (safety management system (SMS) and standard practice). When implemented and rigorously adhered to, these standards form a solid base that aircraft operators can rely on as an indicator that FBOs are taking the necessary steps to ensure the safety of the aircraft, passengers and crew they handle.

Asking “Is your FBO IS-BAH registered and Safety 1st qualified?” is the quickest and simplest means to assess the safety commitment of an FBO. Currently over 600 locations meet the Safety 1st qualification requirements and over 50 FBOs have achieved IS-BAH registration with even more on the way during Q1 of this year. Of course, what is done with this information is up to each individual aircraft operator. Likely, it will be used in combination with other factors. Even though it may not be a sole decision making criterion, there is no replacement for checking an FBO’s Safety 1st and IS-BAH registration status. In fact, aircraft operators can verify Safety 1st & IS-BAH status of FBOs around the world by visiting www.fbostatus.com. A global map utilizing the familiar Google Maps platform displays every FBO in the world that is Safety 1st qualified or IS-BAH registered. The map is searchable by airport, city, state and FBO name and provides a quick way to verify the status of any FBO you might choose to visit.

Ground handling safety is important to FBOs and it is important to you as an aircraft operator. Taking a few moments in your FBO evaluation process to ask, “Are you IS-BAH registered and Safety 1st qualified?” and verifying that status on www.fbostatus.com provides you a critical decision point in your FBO selection process.

Republished from Business Air’s Charter Today (Q1 2017)

EAN Aviation Becomes First African Safety 1st Qualified Location to Appear on NATA’s Global FBO/Ground Handler Status Map

EAN Aviation, of Lagos, Nigeria is the first African company to receive the Safety 1st qualified designation.

To read more about EAN Aviation’s latest achievement, click here.

The FBO/Ground Handler Status Map launched in April to highlight FBOs and ground handlers that are Safety 1st qualified and/or (IS-BAH) registered. View the map at www.fbostatus.com.