NATA HOSTS FIFTH ADVANCED LINE SERVICE WORKSHOP OF 2018 | NEXT WORKSHOP OCTOBER 24-25 IN LONG ISLAND, NY

Last week, NATA wrapped up another successful Advanced Line Service Workshop at Austin Executive Airport in Texas. ALS workshops include a unique mix of technical and service training with sessions on motivation and leadership techniques, customer service training, misfueling prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures (SPCC) training, and the impact of human factors on aviation ground handling. Guest speakers Collin Self of Facet Filters and Keith Clark of Phillips 66 led sessions on aviation fuel filtration, quality control and misfueling prevention. Attendees received hands-on fire extinguisher training during a live fire demonstration conducted by West Chicago Fire Department.

NATA would like to thank Jodie Kaluza and all the staff at Austin Executive Airport for making this event possible. We also appreciate Facet Filters for sponsoring the remaining 2018 ALS Workshops!

There are only 2 more ALS workshops left for this year! Click here for dates and registration information.

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NATA Hosts Third Advanced Line Service Workshop of 2018 | Next Workshop May 1-2 in Chicago

Last week, NATA held its third 2018 Advanced Line Service Workshop at the Centennial Airport Authority (APA) in Englewood, CO. The ALS workshops include a unique mix of technical and service training with sessions on motivation and leadership techniques, customer service training, misfueling prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures (SPCC) training, and the impact of human factors on aviation ground handling.

Guest speakers Rick Spencer of Peco-Facet and Keith Clark of Phillips 66 led sessions on aviation fuel filtration, quality control and misfueling prevention. Attendees also toured Centennial Airport’s air traffic control tower, courtesy of Dennis Fria of the FAA.

NATA would like to thank Deborah Smith and all the staff of the Centennial Airport Authority for making this event possible.

Here is what ALS attendees had to say about the event:

“No matter how many years you have in the aviation industry, the Advanced Line Service Workshop is a must. Regulations are ever-changing and this class provides the information needed for any level of line service.” – Jerome Ballard, Signature Flight Support

“Everybody who decides to be in aviation fueling should take this course to stay up on all the new information and ideas on how to keep themselves and others safe.”- Dale Thresher, Fremont County Airport

NATA is hosting 4 more ALS workshops throughout the country in 2018. Click here for dates and registration information.

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NTSB Safety Alert: Control Foreign Object Debris

Account for all items after performing maintenance tasks!

The problem:

  • Mechanics, or others who help with aircraft maintenance, might leave items or residual debris behind after performing maintenance tasks that could become foreign object debris (FOD). Examples of FOD include tools, hardware, eyeglasses, keys, portable electronic devices (PEDs), paint chips, and metal shavings.
  • If mechanics and others do not account for every item that they use in or around an aircraft and clean as they go, this FOD can be ingested into the engine or interfere with critical flight systems, leading to an accident.

What can you do?

  • Perform an inventory of tools, personal items, AND personal protective equipment before working on an aircraft. Take only what is necessary for the specific maintenance task. Consider placing nonessential personal items, such as jewelry, coins, keys, and PEDs, in a secure location instead of keeping them with you during maintenance tasks.
  • Prepare the workspace on the aircraft by covering up engines, pitot static ports, air inlets, and other areas with protective materials to reduce the likelihood of FOD migration (including residual debris, such as paint chips or metal shavings) to critical flight systems. SA-054 June 2016.
  • While working in low visibility areas (ramp/hangar), ensure that proper lighting is used to check for FOD left behind during maintenance.
  • Keep hardware and consumables in appropriate containers to prevent them from becoming FOD. Store tools in tool boxes and bags, and organize them in a manner so that you can easily recognize if one or more is missing.
  • Distractions can cause you to forget things during maintenance tasks. Always follow the maintenance manual/task card and use a checklist. If you get distracted, go back three steps when restarting your work.
  • As you perform the maintenance task, clean as you go to reduce the likelihood of leaving any items. Keep a FOD container next to you during the maintenance task for easy FOD disposal.
  • Perform a second inventory of tools, any essential personal items, AND personal protective equipment (such as safety glasses, gloves, and hearing protection) after you have completed the maintenance task to ensure that items have not been left behind. Remove any aircraft protective materials so that they do not become FOD.
  • Ask another mechanic to visually inspect your work area for any items that may become FOD. A second set of eyes may see something that you missed.
  • Recognize that human factors issues such as complacency, fatigue, pressure, stress, and a lack of situation awareness can contribute to FOD.
  • Consider conducting daily FOD walks in areas such as hangars, ramps, and runways to identify and remove FOD.

Interested in more information? Click here to read the full NTSB Safety Alert.