NATA HOSTS FOURTH ADVANCED LINE SERVICE WORKSHOP OF 2018 | NEXT WORKSHOP JULY 31-AUGUST 1 IN AUSTIN

NATA wrapped up another successful Advanced Line Service Workshop this past week at DuPage Flight Center in West Chicago, IL. ALS workshops include a unique mix of technical and service training with sessions on motivation and leadership techniques, customer service training, misfueling prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures (SPCC) training, and the impact of human factors on aviation ground handling. Guest speakers Rick Spencer of Peco-Facet and Keith Clark of Phillips 66 led sessions on aviation fuel filtration, quality control and misfueling prevention. Attendees received hands-on fire extinguisher training during a live fire demonstration conducted by West Chicago Fire Department.

NATA would like to thank Brian DeCoudres and all the staff at DuPage Flight Center for making this event possible. We also appreciate Peco-Facet for sponsoring the remaining 2018 ALS Workshops!

NATA is hosting 3 more ALS workshops throughout the country in 2018. Click here for dates and registration information.

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Groups explore how understanding different motivational styles can help draw the best out of employees.

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ALS students learn how to perform API gravity testing which is a vital part of the fuel receipt and quality control process.

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Martin French of TAC Air RDU puts out a live fire during the hands-on extinguisher training session of the Advanced Line Service workshop. NATA would like to thank the West Chicago Fire Department for helping with this invaluable training.

Tips: Securing a Spot on The FBO Status Map

Companies that are qualified to be listed on the FBO Status Map must have all of their line service personnel enrolled or certified in a PLST or Supervisor program. Also, their training status must not be listed as “lapsed” or “expired”.

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To ensure your spot on the map, here are some general tips and guidelines to follow:

  • Keep your “all students” list clean.
    • If there is someone that no longer works for you, mark them inactive. We won’t know a student no longer works for you if they are on your active all students list.
    • If there are employees who do not and will not use training, they should not be on your active all students list.
  • Utilize groups to organize your “all students” list.
    • To be listed on the FBO Status Map, only your line service personnel must be enrolled or certified in a PLST or Supervisor program. To make sure we can see who is classified as line service and who isn’t, keep your students organized in groups. The groups function is found under the Student Management tab and then the “Organize Students” icon.mceclip0
      • Ex. Have groups of your students titled:
        • Line Service Personnel
        • Customer Service Reps
        • Management
  • Keep your students as up-to-date as possible with their training!

When it comes time for an FBO Status Map update and you get a notification email that you have questions or concerns about, feel free to contact us at safety1st@nata.aero! We would be happy to discuss how to make sure you are included on the Map.

Fuel QC Management System Podcast and Webinar | Hear and See Benefits Of This Innovation in Fuel Quality Control

NATA’s Shannon Chambers and Michael France discuss the Safety 1st Fuel QC Management System — a cloud-based digital tool for general and business aviation fuel quality management inspections, record keeping and auditing. The Safety 1st FQMS allows FBOs and other aviation businesses to enhance the visibility and accountability of their QC process. Replacing the traditional pen & paper approach to fuel QC management, the Safety 1st FQMS is easy to use, affordable and flexible enough to accommodate the needs of any size aviation business. Hear more about the benefits provided to fuel handlers and aircraft operators by this breakthrough system.
Find out even more by visiting www.nata.aero/fqms or registering for the April 18th webinar at 2 p.m. Eastern —featuring a live demonstration of the system. During this demonstration, attendees will see the Safety 1st FQMS features in action, including the inspection portal, discrepancy log, automatic alerting and the revolutionary Compliance Sentry technology.

NATA Safety 1st Is Seeking Member Photos of Ground Handling Operations

NATA Safety 1st is currently redeveloping its online training content to incorporate improvements and new features suggested by our members and users. As part of this process, we are seeking new photographs of ground handling activities, such as aircraft fuel and oil servicing, quality control checks, and towing operations. If your company is interested in sharing photos of ground handling operations at your facilities, and possibly having these images featured in the redeveloped NATA Safety 1st training program, please contact our Trainer/Content Manager Steve Berry at sberry@nata.aero.

NATA Presents New Safety 1st Subscription Program

NATA’s New Safety 1st Subscription Program
Expand your training program, not your budget

NATA is pleased to announce the industry-wide launch of its Safety 1st Subscription Program — offering unlimited use of all NATA Safety 1st training at a fixed annual cost and eliminating the additional training expenses incurred by employee turnover. This new program includes a budget-friendly option for monthly billing of the annual fee.

Until now, Safety 1st training has been offered solely on a license-based system, requiring seats to be purchased per student, per course. With 30 online training courses to choose from, the administrative burden of purchasing, assigning and keeping track of licenses can quickly become overwhelming.

The new Subscription Program allows users to access all Safety 1st training at any time, an opportunity to broaden the skills of your staff as you see fit. Courses including health and safety, deicing and hazardous materials are now included in your subscription price. Training your supervisors or line service technicians in 2, 4, 6 or more different disciplines no longer changes your annual training costs and allows your employee to receive even more benefit from their Safety 1st training.

NATA’s Safety 1st Subscription Program also eliminates one of the biggest stressors of the license-based system — paying to train new employees resulting from turnover. Now, the departing employee is simply marked inactive in the system, opening that training slot to your new hire — reducing your additional training expense to zero.

Fixed annual training costs, unlimited use of all Safety 1st training, an option for monthly billing of the annual fee and the elimination of employee training turnover expenses — this new approach is quickly becoming the preferred method of training!

For more information on NATA’s Safety 1st Subscription Program, contact us at safety1st@nata.aero or listen to our podcast!

NATA Holds Successful Advanced Line Service Workshop at Duncan Aviation

NATA wrapped up another successful Advanced Line Service Workshop last week at Duncan Aviation in Lincoln, NE. The two-day event included sessions on Motivation and Leadership techniques, Customer Service training, Misfueling Prevention, and how Human Factors affect safety in aviation ground handling. Guest speakers Dennis Thompson of Peco-Facet, and Keith Clark of Phillips 66 also led sessions on aviation fuel filtration and quality control, and Justin Schack of General Fire and Safety provided hands on fire-extinguisher training.

Attendees also toured the MRO, Paint, and Fuel Farm facilities at Duncan Aviation.

Ed Sabata- Line Service Trainer/QA Specialist for Duncan Aviation who attended the event said:

“This is one of the best training courses I have been to. Always a good refresher course to keep you motivated. A great course for any Line Service Rep.”

NATA would like to thank Megan Sanburn, Troy Hyberger, and all the staff at Duncan Aviation for making this event possible.

Register now for the last ALS workshop of 2017 this November in Fort Myers, FL!

Including Safety in Your FBO Selection

Aircraft operators consider a number of factors when choosing an FBO: available facilities, customer service, fuel cost, hangar availability, location and fees. As you read that list, one important item is absent – safety. A recent study by the VanAllen Group found that ground incidents accounted for “the largest source of [insurance] claims payments.”

Though safety is not on the list above, the bottom line is that aircraft operators care about safety in all they do. In fact, a focus on FBO safety is considered a given expectation. Think about the last time you went to a restaurant; did you spend any time thinking about whether the food you consumed would give you food poisoning? Probably not, and this is not because you don’t care about food safety, but rather because you assume that restaurant is focusing on preventing food borne illness. The same is true with FBO selection, an FBO with quality facilities, great customer service, and competitive pricing must be doing the right things when it comes to safety, correct?

FBO safety is also challenging to assess from afar. How can a dispatcher, scheduler or flight coordinator effectively evaluate an FBO’s safety program during a phone call? Challenges aside, with ground handling incidents being a leading cause of aircraft damage, our industry has determined that aircraft operators should be even more proactive when it comes to ensuring ground safety of aircraft at remote locations. Standards like the International Standard – Business Aircraft Operations (IS-BAO) and the Air Charter Safety Foundation’s (ACSF) Industry Audit Standard (IAS) both include requirements for reviewing ground handling safety while aircraft are away from home. So what can an aircraft operator do?

First, we must understand the basis for ground handling safety in our industry. In the U.S. ground handling is governed by industry standard. Some of those standards include Airlines for America’s (A4A) Spec 103 (fuel quality), NATA’s Safety 1st Program (operational safety training) and the International Standard – Business Aircraft Handling (safety management system (SMS) and standard practice). When implemented and rigorously adhered to, these standards form a solid base that aircraft operators can rely on as an indicator that FBOs are taking the necessary steps to ensure the safety of the aircraft, passengers and crew they handle.

Asking “Is your FBO IS-BAH registered and Safety 1st qualified?” is the quickest and simplest means to assess the safety commitment of an FBO. Currently over 600 locations meet the Safety 1st qualification requirements and over 50 FBOs have achieved IS-BAH registration with even more on the way during Q1 of this year. Of course, what is done with this information is up to each individual aircraft operator. Likely, it will be used in combination with other factors. Even though it may not be a sole decision making criterion, there is no replacement for checking an FBO’s Safety 1st and IS-BAH registration status. In fact, aircraft operators can verify Safety 1st & IS-BAH status of FBOs around the world by visiting www.fbostatus.com. A global map utilizing the familiar Google Maps platform displays every FBO in the world that is Safety 1st qualified or IS-BAH registered. The map is searchable by airport, city, state and FBO name and provides a quick way to verify the status of any FBO you might choose to visit.

Ground handling safety is important to FBOs and it is important to you as an aircraft operator. Taking a few moments in your FBO evaluation process to ask, “Are you IS-BAH registered and Safety 1st qualified?” and verifying that status on www.fbostatus.com provides you a critical decision point in your FBO selection process.

Republished from Business Air’s Charter Today (Q1 2017)