Airlines for America Releases ATA 103 Update and New Revision

This month, Airlines for America (A4A) published bulletin 2017.2: Modified ATA 103 Requirements for Filter Monitors, and released a revised ATA 103 (v2017.2) which includes updates from the bulletin and will replace the previous 2017.1 revision. The bulletin and revised ATA 103 come after the IATA SAP Special Interests Group’s position statement regarding filter monitors. Key highlights of the bulletin and revised ATA 103 include a reduction in the maximum differential pressure (DP) for filter monitor elements to 15psid and the addition of section 3.17 to the ATA 103 which details an Aircraft Fueling Nozzle Strainer Cleaning Procedure for Fueling Equipment with Filter Monitors.

Key highlights of the bulletin include a reduction in the maximum differential pressure (DP) for filter monitor elements to 15psid and the addition of section 3.17 to the ATA 103, which details an Aircraft Fueling Nozzle Strainer Cleaning Procedure for Fueling Equipment with Filter Monitors.

Important Industry Update Concerning Monitor Filter Elements

Last month, the International Air Transportation Association (IATA) issued a position statement from their special interest group on Super Absorbent Polymer or, SAP (the media used in EI 1583 filter monitor cartridges), which recommended that filter monitors be phased out of all aviation fuel handling systems. The announcement came after eight separate, documented incidents in which SAP was found downstream in engine/airframe fuel system components.

Following the initial position statement from IATA, several leading industry groups have issued their own statements. As such, Parker’s Velcon Aviation Filtration Division issued Service Bulletin 1217-1, which seeks to clarify the various current positions. The bulletin includes the collective “best practices” of IATA, A4A, JIG, and EI along with Parker’s “go-forward” actions for their EI 1583 qualified monitor elements.

The recommendations include:

  • Fuel filter monitors to meet new 7th edition criteria from the Energy Institute (Implementation period TBD)
  • Maximum allowable monitor vessel differential pressure-15 psid (1 bar) *This is an important reduction from the 22 psid outlined in the latest revision of ATA Spec 103.
  • Differential pressure switches for use on fuel filter monitor housings
  • Change all nozzle hose end strainers to 100 mesh
  • Regular cleaning of the hose end strainer (final procedure and timing TBD)

This is an ongoing issue and NATA will continue to keep you updated on the latest developments as they become available.

 

How Do I Reset My Password And Other Safety 1st Questions

By Alexandra Connole, Membership Services Coordinator

As the industry-leading ground handling safety training program, NATA Safety 1st is used by over 1,500 companies globally. With all of these users, we understand that questions about utilizing our training system occasionally arise. But not to worry, as Membership Services Coordinator I have the answers. If I have not spoken to you already, my name is Alexandra Connole and when contacting Safety 1st by email or over the phone, I am your point of contact. It is my goal to make sure you, as Safety 1st users, can easily and efficiently use our training.

As a resource for all Safety 1st users, myself and Managing Director of Marketing & Communications Shannon Chambers cover some of the most frequently asked questions about the administration of the Safety 1st program in NATA’s latest podcast episode.

Some of the topics included in our podcast are:

  • Resetting passwords
  • Accessing training
  • Printing certificates
  • Employee turnover

To access our podcast, listen here or read the transcript.

Looking for more answers? We have another great source of information on our support website. Here you can navigate through step-by-step articles for more technical questions, including articles for either administrators or students on purchasing and transferring your training.

If you are looking to reach somebody in person, you can always email safety1st@nata.aero or give us a call at (202) 774-1532 and I would be happy to answer any questions that you may have.

NATA Holds Successful Advanced Line Service Workshop at Duncan Aviation

NATA wrapped up another successful Advanced Line Service Workshop last week at Duncan Aviation in Lincoln, NE. The two-day event included sessions on Motivation and Leadership techniques, Customer Service training, Misfueling Prevention, and how Human Factors affect safety in aviation ground handling. Guest speakers Dennis Thompson of Peco-Facet, and Keith Clark of Phillips 66 also led sessions on aviation fuel filtration and quality control, and Justin Schack of General Fire and Safety provided hands on fire-extinguisher training.

Attendees also toured the MRO, Paint, and Fuel Farm facilities at Duncan Aviation.

Ed Sabata- Line Service Trainer/QA Specialist for Duncan Aviation who attended the event said:

“This is one of the best training courses I have been to. Always a good refresher course to keep you motivated. A great course for any Line Service Rep.”

NATA would like to thank Megan Sanburn, Troy Hyberger, and all the staff at Duncan Aviation for making this event possible.

Register now for the last ALS workshop of 2017 this November in Fort Myers, FL!

Important Changes to ATA 103 – Standards for Jet Fuel Quality Control at Airports

UDPATE: The maximum DP for filter monitors referenced with-in this article has been reverted back to 15psi. See our other NATA SafetyNet blog posts for the latest concerning filter monitors and other industry news.

This month, Airlines for America (A4A) announced several significant changes to their ATA 103 Specification – Standards for Jet Fuel Quality Control at Airports. Chief among these changes is an extension of coalescer filter elements from a one-year replacement schedule to a three-year replacement schedule. The coalescer filter housings are still required to be opened and inspected annually for cleanliness and element integrity, and the maximum allowable differential pressure (DP) remains 15psi. Monitor filter elements had their maximum allowable DP extended to 22psi, but are still required to be replaced annually. Another important change came in the elimination of the required monthly upstream membrane color/particle check, or “Millipore” test (downstream testing is still required monthly).

 

The announcement came after a “comprehensive review and update” by the A4A Fuel Technical Committee, and included several other key highlights. The new revision ATA 103 2017.1 is expected to be published next month, and will include additional updates not outlined in the announcement.  A copy of the full announcement can be viewed here.

NATA Safety 1st Participates in Air BP Product Quality and Operations Seminar

On June 20th, NATA’s Trainer/Content Manager Steve Berry participated in Air BP’s Product Quality and Operations Seminar in Grand Rapids, MI. Berry provided attendees with an industry update on ground handling safety, the latest in the Safety 1st redevelopment process and information on the IS-BAH (International Standard for Business Aircraft Handling) program. The one-day event included hands-on fueling procedure demonstrations and offered insight on aviation fuel filtration, product quality assurance, microbiological contamination, misfueling prevention, and fuel system maintenance.

Steve @ air bp 6.20.17

New Guidelines Announced for Absorbent Monitor Filter Elements

Last week, Airlines for America (A4A) and the International Air Transport Association (IATA) released new guidelines for placing water absorbing monitor filter vessels into service following the replacement of monitor filter elements. The new guidelines call for flushing of the filter vessel prior to placing the vessel into service. For specific guidelines, please click here.