NATA Safety 1st Participates in Air BP Product Quality and Operations Seminar

On June 20th, NATA’s Trainer/Content Manager Steve Berry participated in Air BP’s Product Quality and Operations Seminar in Grand Rapids, MI. Berry provided attendees with an industry update on ground handling safety, the latest in the Safety 1st redevelopment process and information on the IS-BAH (International Standard for Business Aircraft Handling) program. The one-day event included hands-on fueling procedure demonstrations and offered insight on aviation fuel filtration, product quality assurance, microbiological contamination, misfueling prevention, and fuel system maintenance.

Steve @ air bp 6.20.17

New Guidelines Announced for Absorbent Monitor Filter Elements

Last week, Airlines for America (A4A) and the International Air Transport Association (IATA) released new guidelines for placing water absorbing monitor filter vessels into service following the replacement of monitor filter elements. The new guidelines call for flushing of the filter vessel prior to placing the vessel into service. For specific guidelines, please click here.

Safety 1st Update and Training Expansion Training for Aircraft Operators

The NATA Safety 1st program is known around the world as the leader in ground handling safety training. The program is in use at more than 600 different locations globally, and has provided training for over 30,000 individuals since its online launch in 2008. The Safety 1st logo can be found at leading FBOs, aircraft operators that provide their own ground handling, and maintenance shops that want to ensure they are using the best training for the safe ground handling of the aircraft they service.

With this foundation, NATA recently announced the launch of a new arm of our education and training outreach, the Part 135/91 Training Center. The Training Center provides organizations with access to a wealth of training resources for pilots, aeromedical crewmembers, aircraft flight coordinators and aircraft ground handling team members. The Part 135/91 Training Center utilizes the same technology that makes Safety 1st so effective in providing high-quality, economical and trusted training to air charter operators and corporate flight departments. Training is sold in a unique, unlimited-use subscription that allows your team to train when needed on the topics that are most important at that time.

Content in the NATA Part 135/91 Training Center includes:

■ General Subjects Pilot Courses
■ Crew Resources Management
■ Hazmat Will or Will-Not-Carry
■ Aeromedical Flight Crewmember
■ Aircraft Flight Coordinator
■ Organizational Safety Training
■ Ground Handling & Fueling Safety

Demonstration access to the Training Center is available upon request. More information on the specific courses available can be found at www.nata.aero/trainingcenter.

Upcoming 2017 In-Person Training Events
■ Certified CSR Program – Tampa, FL – April 18-19
■ Aviation Food Safety Workshop – Tampa, FL – April 20
■ Advanced Line Service Workshop – Phoenix, AZ – April 19-20
■ Essentials of Hanger Subleasing Seminar – Chicago, IL – May 16-17
■ Advanced Line Service Workshop – Reno, NV – May 23-24
■ Safety 1st Certified Trainer Program – Cincinnati, OH – July 18-19

For more information or to register, visit www.nata.aero/events.

Top OSHA Safety Violations
The United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released its Top 10 Most Frequently Cited Standards earlier this year. According to OSHA, the list serves “to alert employers about these commonly-cited standards so they can take steps to find and fix recognized hazards addressed in these and other standards before OSHA shows up.”

Top 10 Most Frequently Cited Standards

1. Fall Protection
2. Hazard Communication
3. Scaffolding
4. Respiratory Protection
5. Lockout/Tagout
6. Powered Industrial Trucks
7. Ladders
8. Electrical, Wiring Methods
9. Machine Guarding
10. Electrical, General Requirements.

While some of these may not impact your business, fall protection, hazard communication and ladders affect most aviation businesses. Do you have, and train your staff on a Hazard Communication Plan each year? If not, take a few minutes and review the list of OSHA training available from Safety 1st (www.nata.aero/safety1st). Many of these cited standards can be relatively easy to comply with–if you have the right information and training!

Republished from the 2017 Q1 Aviation Business Journal.

Including Safety in Your FBO Selection

Aircraft operators consider a number of factors when choosing an FBO: available facilities, customer service, fuel cost, hangar availability, location and fees. As you read that list, one important item is absent – safety. A recent study by the VanAllen Group found that ground incidents accounted for “the largest source of [insurance] claims payments.”

Though safety is not on the list above, the bottom line is that aircraft operators care about safety in all they do. In fact, a focus on FBO safety is considered a given expectation. Think about the last time you went to a restaurant; did you spend any time thinking about whether the food you consumed would give you food poisoning? Probably not, and this is not because you don’t care about food safety, but rather because you assume that restaurant is focusing on preventing food borne illness. The same is true with FBO selection, an FBO with quality facilities, great customer service, and competitive pricing must be doing the right things when it comes to safety, correct?

FBO safety is also challenging to assess from afar. How can a dispatcher, scheduler or flight coordinator effectively evaluate an FBO’s safety program during a phone call? Challenges aside, with ground handling incidents being a leading cause of aircraft damage, our industry has determined that aircraft operators should be even more proactive when it comes to ensuring ground safety of aircraft at remote locations. Standards like the International Standard – Business Aircraft Operations (IS-BAO) and the Air Charter Safety Foundation’s (ACSF) Industry Audit Standard (IAS) both include requirements for reviewing ground handling safety while aircraft are away from home. So what can an aircraft operator do?

First, we must understand the basis for ground handling safety in our industry. In the U.S. ground handling is governed by industry standard. Some of those standards include Airlines for America’s (A4A) Spec 103 (fuel quality), NATA’s Safety 1st Program (operational safety training) and the International Standard – Business Aircraft Handling (safety management system (SMS) and standard practice). When implemented and rigorously adhered to, these standards form a solid base that aircraft operators can rely on as an indicator that FBOs are taking the necessary steps to ensure the safety of the aircraft, passengers and crew they handle.

Asking “Is your FBO IS-BAH registered and Safety 1st qualified?” is the quickest and simplest means to assess the safety commitment of an FBO. Currently over 600 locations meet the Safety 1st qualification requirements and over 50 FBOs have achieved IS-BAH registration with even more on the way during Q1 of this year. Of course, what is done with this information is up to each individual aircraft operator. Likely, it will be used in combination with other factors. Even though it may not be a sole decision making criterion, there is no replacement for checking an FBO’s Safety 1st and IS-BAH registration status. In fact, aircraft operators can verify Safety 1st & IS-BAH status of FBOs around the world by visiting www.fbostatus.com. A global map utilizing the familiar Google Maps platform displays every FBO in the world that is Safety 1st qualified or IS-BAH registered. The map is searchable by airport, city, state and FBO name and provides a quick way to verify the status of any FBO you might choose to visit.

Ground handling safety is important to FBOs and it is important to you as an aircraft operator. Taking a few moments in your FBO evaluation process to ask, “Are you IS-BAH registered and Safety 1st qualified?” and verifying that status on www.fbostatus.com provides you a critical decision point in your FBO selection process.

Republished from Business Air’s Charter Today (Q1 2017)

EAN Aviation Becomes First African Safety 1st Qualified Location to Appear on NATA’s Global FBO/Ground Handler Status Map

EAN Aviation, of Lagos, Nigeria is the first African company to receive the Safety 1st qualified designation.

To read more about EAN Aviation’s latest achievement, click here.

The FBO/Ground Handler Status Map launched in April to highlight FBOs and ground handlers that are Safety 1st qualified and/or (IS-BAH) registered. View the map at www.fbostatus.com.

NTSB Safety Alert: Control Foreign Object Debris

Account for all items after performing maintenance tasks!

The problem:

  • Mechanics, or others who help with aircraft maintenance, might leave items or residual debris behind after performing maintenance tasks that could become foreign object debris (FOD). Examples of FOD include tools, hardware, eyeglasses, keys, portable electronic devices (PEDs), paint chips, and metal shavings.
  • If mechanics and others do not account for every item that they use in or around an aircraft and clean as they go, this FOD can be ingested into the engine or interfere with critical flight systems, leading to an accident.

What can you do?

  • Perform an inventory of tools, personal items, AND personal protective equipment before working on an aircraft. Take only what is necessary for the specific maintenance task. Consider placing nonessential personal items, such as jewelry, coins, keys, and PEDs, in a secure location instead of keeping them with you during maintenance tasks.
  • Prepare the workspace on the aircraft by covering up engines, pitot static ports, air inlets, and other areas with protective materials to reduce the likelihood of FOD migration (including residual debris, such as paint chips or metal shavings) to critical flight systems. SA-054 June 2016.
  • While working in low visibility areas (ramp/hangar), ensure that proper lighting is used to check for FOD left behind during maintenance.
  • Keep hardware and consumables in appropriate containers to prevent them from becoming FOD. Store tools in tool boxes and bags, and organize them in a manner so that you can easily recognize if one or more is missing.
  • Distractions can cause you to forget things during maintenance tasks. Always follow the maintenance manual/task card and use a checklist. If you get distracted, go back three steps when restarting your work.
  • As you perform the maintenance task, clean as you go to reduce the likelihood of leaving any items. Keep a FOD container next to you during the maintenance task for easy FOD disposal.
  • Perform a second inventory of tools, any essential personal items, AND personal protective equipment (such as safety glasses, gloves, and hearing protection) after you have completed the maintenance task to ensure that items have not been left behind. Remove any aircraft protective materials so that they do not become FOD.
  • Ask another mechanic to visually inspect your work area for any items that may become FOD. A second set of eyes may see something that you missed.
  • Recognize that human factors issues such as complacency, fatigue, pressure, stress, and a lack of situation awareness can contribute to FOD.
  • Consider conducting daily FOD walks in areas such as hangars, ramps, and runways to identify and remove FOD.

Interested in more information? Click here to read the full NTSB Safety Alert.

CONGRATULATIONS: Curaçao Air Terminal Services Earn IS-BAH Certification

NATA would like to congratulate member, Curaçao Air Terminal Services (CATS) for recently becoming IS-BAH Registered!

Click here to read about CATS’ accomplishment.

Check out the FBO / Ground Handling Status Map to see what other service facilities are Safety 1st Qualified and/or IS-BAH registered. To find out more about the IS-BAH program, please visit http://nata.aero/Safety-1st.aspx.