How Do I Reset My Password And Other Safety 1st Questions

By Alexandra Connole, Membership Services Coordinator

As the industry-leading ground handling safety training program, NATA Safety 1st is used by over 1,500 companies globally. With all of these users, we understand that questions about utilizing our training system occasionally arise. But not to worry, as Membership Services Coordinator I have the answers. If I have not spoken to you already, my name is Alexandra Connole and when contacting Safety 1st by email or over the phone, I am your point of contact. It is my goal to make sure you, as Safety 1st users, can easily and efficiently use our training.

As a resource for all Safety 1st users, myself and Managing Director of Marketing & Communications Shannon Chambers cover some of the most frequently asked questions about the administration of the Safety 1st program in NATA’s latest podcast episode.

Some of the topics included in our podcast are:

  • Resetting passwords
  • Accessing training
  • Printing certificates
  • Employee turnover

To access our podcast, listen here or read the transcript.

Looking for more answers? We have another great source of information on our support website. Here you can navigate through step-by-step articles for more technical questions, including articles for either administrators or students on purchasing and transferring your training.

If you are looking to reach somebody in person, you can always email safety1st@nata.aero or give us a call at (202) 774-1532 and I would be happy to answer any questions that you may have.

NATA Holds Successful Advanced Line Service Workshop at Duncan Aviation

NATA wrapped up another successful Advanced Line Service Workshop last week at Duncan Aviation in Lincoln, NE. The two-day event included sessions on Motivation and Leadership techniques, Customer Service training, Misfueling Prevention, and how Human Factors affect safety in aviation ground handling. Guest speakers Dennis Thompson of Peco-Facet, and Keith Clark of Phillips 66 also led sessions on aviation fuel filtration and quality control, and Justin Schack of General Fire and Safety provided hands on fire-extinguisher training.

Attendees also toured the MRO, Paint, and Fuel Farm facilities at Duncan Aviation.

Ed Sabata- Line Service Trainer/QA Specialist for Duncan Aviation who attended the event said:

“This is one of the best training courses I have been to. Always a good refresher course to keep you motivated. A great course for any Line Service Rep.”

NATA would like to thank Megan Sanburn, Troy Hyberger, and all the staff at Duncan Aviation for making this event possible.

Register now for the last ALS workshop of 2017 this November in Fort Myers, FL!

Important Changes to ATA 103 – Standards for Jet Fuel Quality Control at Airports

This month, Airlines for America (A4A) announced several significant changes to their ATA 103 Specification – Standards for Jet Fuel Quality Control at Airports. Chief among these changes is an extension of coalescer filter elements from a one-year replacement schedule to a three-year replacement schedule. The coalescer filter housings are still required to be opened and inspected annually for cleanliness and element integrity, and the maximum allowable differential pressure (DP) remains 15psi. Monitor filter elements had their maximum allowable DP extended to 22psi, but are still required to be replaced annually. Another important change came in the elimination of the required monthly upstream membrane color/particle check, or “Millipore” test (downstream testing is still required monthly).

 

The announcement came after a “comprehensive review and update” by the A4A Fuel Technical Committee, and included several other key highlights. The new revision ATA 103 2017.1 is expected to be published next month, and will include additional updates not outlined in the announcement.  A copy of the full announcement can be viewed here.

NATA Safety 1st Participates in Air BP Product Quality and Operations Seminar

On June 20th, NATA’s Trainer/Content Manager Steve Berry participated in Air BP’s Product Quality and Operations Seminar in Grand Rapids, MI. Berry provided attendees with an industry update on ground handling safety, the latest in the Safety 1st redevelopment process and information on the IS-BAH (International Standard for Business Aircraft Handling) program. The one-day event included hands-on fueling procedure demonstrations and offered insight on aviation fuel filtration, product quality assurance, microbiological contamination, misfueling prevention, and fuel system maintenance.

Steve @ air bp 6.20.17

New Guidelines Announced for Absorbent Monitor Filter Elements

Last week, Airlines for America (A4A) and the International Air Transport Association (IATA) released new guidelines for placing water absorbing monitor filter vessels into service following the replacement of monitor filter elements. The new guidelines call for flushing of the filter vessel prior to placing the vessel into service. For specific guidelines, please click here.

Safety 1st Update and Training Expansion Training for Aircraft Operators

The NATA Safety 1st program is known around the world as the leader in ground handling safety training. The program is in use at more than 600 different locations globally, and has provided training for over 30,000 individuals since its online launch in 2008. The Safety 1st logo can be found at leading FBOs, aircraft operators that provide their own ground handling, and maintenance shops that want to ensure they are using the best training for the safe ground handling of the aircraft they service.

With this foundation, NATA recently announced the launch of a new arm of our education and training outreach, the Part 135/91 Training Center. The Training Center provides organizations with access to a wealth of training resources for pilots, aeromedical crewmembers, aircraft flight coordinators and aircraft ground handling team members. The Part 135/91 Training Center utilizes the same technology that makes Safety 1st so effective in providing high-quality, economical and trusted training to air charter operators and corporate flight departments. Training is sold in a unique, unlimited-use subscription that allows your team to train when needed on the topics that are most important at that time.

Content in the NATA Part 135/91 Training Center includes:

■ General Subjects Pilot Courses
■ Crew Resources Management
■ Hazmat Will or Will-Not-Carry
■ Aeromedical Flight Crewmember
■ Aircraft Flight Coordinator
■ Organizational Safety Training
■ Ground Handling & Fueling Safety

Demonstration access to the Training Center is available upon request. More information on the specific courses available can be found at www.nata.aero/trainingcenter.

Upcoming 2017 In-Person Training Events
■ Certified CSR Program – Tampa, FL – April 18-19
■ Aviation Food Safety Workshop – Tampa, FL – April 20
■ Advanced Line Service Workshop – Phoenix, AZ – April 19-20
■ Essentials of Hanger Subleasing Seminar – Chicago, IL – May 16-17
■ Advanced Line Service Workshop – Reno, NV – May 23-24
■ Safety 1st Certified Trainer Program – Cincinnati, OH – July 18-19

For more information or to register, visit www.nata.aero/events.

Top OSHA Safety Violations
The United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released its Top 10 Most Frequently Cited Standards earlier this year. According to OSHA, the list serves “to alert employers about these commonly-cited standards so they can take steps to find and fix recognized hazards addressed in these and other standards before OSHA shows up.”

Top 10 Most Frequently Cited Standards

1. Fall Protection
2. Hazard Communication
3. Scaffolding
4. Respiratory Protection
5. Lockout/Tagout
6. Powered Industrial Trucks
7. Ladders
8. Electrical, Wiring Methods
9. Machine Guarding
10. Electrical, General Requirements.

While some of these may not impact your business, fall protection, hazard communication and ladders affect most aviation businesses. Do you have, and train your staff on a Hazard Communication Plan each year? If not, take a few minutes and review the list of OSHA training available from Safety 1st (www.nata.aero/safety1st). Many of these cited standards can be relatively easy to comply with–if you have the right information and training!

Republished from the 2017 Q1 Aviation Business Journal.

Including Safety in Your FBO Selection

Aircraft operators consider a number of factors when choosing an FBO: available facilities, customer service, fuel cost, hangar availability, location and fees. As you read that list, one important item is absent – safety. A recent study by the VanAllen Group found that ground incidents accounted for “the largest source of [insurance] claims payments.”

Though safety is not on the list above, the bottom line is that aircraft operators care about safety in all they do. In fact, a focus on FBO safety is considered a given expectation. Think about the last time you went to a restaurant; did you spend any time thinking about whether the food you consumed would give you food poisoning? Probably not, and this is not because you don’t care about food safety, but rather because you assume that restaurant is focusing on preventing food borne illness. The same is true with FBO selection, an FBO with quality facilities, great customer service, and competitive pricing must be doing the right things when it comes to safety, correct?

FBO safety is also challenging to assess from afar. How can a dispatcher, scheduler or flight coordinator effectively evaluate an FBO’s safety program during a phone call? Challenges aside, with ground handling incidents being a leading cause of aircraft damage, our industry has determined that aircraft operators should be even more proactive when it comes to ensuring ground safety of aircraft at remote locations. Standards like the International Standard – Business Aircraft Operations (IS-BAO) and the Air Charter Safety Foundation’s (ACSF) Industry Audit Standard (IAS) both include requirements for reviewing ground handling safety while aircraft are away from home. So what can an aircraft operator do?

First, we must understand the basis for ground handling safety in our industry. In the U.S. ground handling is governed by industry standard. Some of those standards include Airlines for America’s (A4A) Spec 103 (fuel quality), NATA’s Safety 1st Program (operational safety training) and the International Standard – Business Aircraft Handling (safety management system (SMS) and standard practice). When implemented and rigorously adhered to, these standards form a solid base that aircraft operators can rely on as an indicator that FBOs are taking the necessary steps to ensure the safety of the aircraft, passengers and crew they handle.

Asking “Is your FBO IS-BAH registered and Safety 1st qualified?” is the quickest and simplest means to assess the safety commitment of an FBO. Currently over 600 locations meet the Safety 1st qualification requirements and over 50 FBOs have achieved IS-BAH registration with even more on the way during Q1 of this year. Of course, what is done with this information is up to each individual aircraft operator. Likely, it will be used in combination with other factors. Even though it may not be a sole decision making criterion, there is no replacement for checking an FBO’s Safety 1st and IS-BAH registration status. In fact, aircraft operators can verify Safety 1st & IS-BAH status of FBOs around the world by visiting www.fbostatus.com. A global map utilizing the familiar Google Maps platform displays every FBO in the world that is Safety 1st qualified or IS-BAH registered. The map is searchable by airport, city, state and FBO name and provides a quick way to verify the status of any FBO you might choose to visit.

Ground handling safety is important to FBOs and it is important to you as an aircraft operator. Taking a few moments in your FBO evaluation process to ask, “Are you IS-BAH registered and Safety 1st qualified?” and verifying that status on www.fbostatus.com provides you a critical decision point in your FBO selection process.

Republished from Business Air’s Charter Today (Q1 2017)